THE TEN COMMANDMENTS

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“THE TEN COMMANDMENTS ARE ACTUALLY TEN CATEGORIES!”
“A WAKE UP CALL FOR LAST DAYS CHRISTIAN SAINTS!”

“Understanding the Two Tablets of Stones and their True Meanings!”

• There are 613 Commandments, not 10!
• Ten Commandments are actually 10 categories, not individual commands!
• The 10 are divided into duties to God, and duties to People!

Pls Remember That These Are The 10 Categories of the 613 Commandments! (Mitzvot) All 613 Commandments fall under one of these Ten Categories which is why God memorialized them of Two Tablets of Stone!

1) BELIEF IN GOD;
This category is derived from the declaration in Ex. 20:2 beginning, “I am the Lord, your God…”

2) PROHIBITION OF IMPROPER WORSHIP;
This category is derived from Ex. 20:3-6, beginning, “You shall not have other gods…” It encompasses within it the prohibition against the worship of other gods as well as the prohibition of improper forms of worship of the one true God, such as worshiping God through an idol.

3) PROHIBITION OF MAKING FALSE OATHS;
This category is derived from Ex. 20:7, beginning, “You shall not take the name of the Lord your God in vain” This includes prohibitions against perjury, breaking or delaying the performance of vows or promises, and speaking God’s name or swearing Oaths unnecessarily.

4) OBSERVANCE OF SACRED TIMES;
This category is derived from Ex. 20:8-11, beginning, “Remember the Sabbath day…” It encompasses all mitzvot related to Shabbat, holidays, or other sacred time.

5) RESPECT FOR PARENTS AND TEACHERS;
This category is derived from Ex. 20:12, beginning, “Honor your father and mother…”

6) PROHIBITION OF PHYSICALLY HARMING A PERSON;
This category is derived from Ex. 20:13, saying, “You shall not murder.”

7) PROHIBITION OF SEXUAL IMMORALITY;
This category is derived from Ex. 20:13, saying, “You shall not commit adultery.”

8) PROHIBITION OF THEFT;
This category is derived from Ex. 20:13, saying, “You shall not steal.” It includes within it both outright robbery as well as various forms of theft by deception and unethical business practices. It also includes kidnapping, which is essentially “stealing” a person.

9) PROHIBITION OF HARMING A PERSON THROUGH SPEECH;
This category is derived from Ex. 20:13, saying, “You shall not bear false witness against your neighbor.” It includes all forms of lashon ha-ra (sins relating to speech).

10) PROHIBITION OF COVETING;
This category is derived from Ex. 20:14, starts, “You shall not covet your neighbor’s house…”

If you count the words in the 10 category/commandments you’ll find that there are 613 in total, thus the 10 category/commands, span 613!

Torah – gematria 611 + 2 laws that Moses received directly on Mount Sinai = 613! Moses 611 commandments combined with the first two which were heard directly from God’s own voice on Mount Sinai, adds up to a total of 613!

“The Two Tablets of Stone shadows God’s Two Greatest Commandments” – Man’s Duties to God and Man’s Duties to People!

Judaism teaches that the first stone tablet, containing the first 5 declarations, identifies duties regarding our relationship with God, while the second stone tablet, containing the last 5 declarations, identifies duties regarding relationships with others!

You may have noticed, however, that the fifth category, which is included in the first tablet, is the category to honor father and mother, which would seem to concern relationships between people! The rabbis teach that our parents are our creators and stand in a relationship to us akin to our relationship to the Divine! Throughout Jewish liturgy, the Creator is referred to as Avinu Malkeinu, our Father, our King. Disrespect to our biological creators is not merely an affront to them; it is also an insult to the Creator of the Universe! Accordingly, honor of father and mother is included on the tablet of duties to God the Father!

But, what about the so-called “Ten Commandments,” the words recorded in Exodus 20, the words that the Creator Himself wrote on the two stone tablets that Moses brought down from Mount Sinai (Ex. 31:18), which Moses smashed upon seeing the idolatry of the golden calf (Ex. 32:19)?

“In the Torah, these words are never referred to as the Ten Commandments!”

In the Torah, they are called Aseret ha-D’varim (Ex. 34:28, Deut. 4:13 and Deut. 10:4). In rabbinical texts, they are referred to as Aseret ha-Dibrot. The words d’varim and dibrot come from the Hebrew root Dalet-Beit-Reish, meaning word, speak or thing; thus, the phrase is accurately translated as the Ten Sayings, the Ten Statements, the Ten Declarations, the Ten Words or even the Ten Things, or Ten Utterances, but not as the Ten Commandments, which would be Aseret ha-Mitzvot. In Hebrew, “Mitzvot” means Commandment!

The Aseret ha-Dibrot are not understood as individual mitzvots; rather, they are categories or classifications of mitzvots! Each of the 613 mitzvot can be summed up under one of these ten categories, some in more obvious ways than others! For example, the mitzvah not to work on Shabbat rather obviously falls within the category of remembering the Sabbath day and keeping it holy! The mitzvah to fast on Yom Kippur fits into that category somewhat less obviously: all holidays are in some sense a Sabbath, and the category encompasses any mitzvah related to sacred times!

The precise numbering and division of these precepts into “Ten Commandments” is somewhat uncertain! Scripture never mentions “The Ten Commandments!” Oh, sure, the commandments themselves are in the Bible, true! But the phrase “The Ten Commandments” is never found!

If you have a bit of Bible knowledge or a good Bible search tool, you will quickly find three passages that use the phrase “the Ten Commandments” (capitalized or not): Exodus 34:28, Deuteronomy 4:13, and Deuteronomy 10:4.

Unfortunately, our translators have bowed to a tradition dating to the middle-ages and have not provided an accurate translation in our bibles!

The Hebrew words used in those verses (aseret ha-de’varim) are more accurately translated as “the Ten Words”… not “the Ten Commandments”.

Our English Bibles have completely added those words, “Ten Commandments,” incorrectly! While the Septuagint, (Greek Bible) accurately translates the Hebrew and uses the Greek equivalent of “the Ten Words”, more correctly, “Deka Logous!” Which should be in English, “The Decalogue!”

in actual fact, Scripture never mentions “The Ten Commandments!”
Exodus 31:18 – And He gave to Moses, when he had finished speaking with him on Mount Sinai, “the Two Tablets of the Testimony,” tablets of stone, written with the finger of God.

Some of you with more than a cursory knowledge of Scripture may be quick to point out that the list of the Ten Comma… uh, the Ten Words is given in two places: Exodus 20:1-17 and Deuteronomy 5:4-21.

Run after the most ‘minor’ mitzvah as you would after the most ‘important’ and flee from transgression, because doing one mitzvah draws you into doing another, and doing one transgression draws you into doing another, and because the reward for a mitzvah is a mitzvah and the punishment for a transgression is a transgression! In other words, every mitzvah is important, because even the most seemingly trivial mitzvot draw you into a pattern of leading your life in accordance with the Creator’s wishes, rather than in accordance with your own!

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